Hindol Sengupta

Hindol Sengupta

Editor-at-large

Fortune India’s resident author (with six books under his belt) writes on a range of subjects from luxury to politics. He most enjoys telling stories of people and companies at the intersection of politics and business. His book, Recasting India was the only Indian book to be nominated for the Hayek Prize. He is also the youngest Indian to win the PSF Award for his writing.

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Recent stories by Hindol Sengupta:

5 people to watch out for

The best work is not always recognised early. Louis Vuitton and Thierry Hermès, while respected craftsmen, were not global celebrities. So every year we hand-pick people we think are true artisans. Some may be names you have never heard of. They are here because you will.

The mediator

Art of Living and Sudarshan Kriya have made Sri Sri Ravi Shankar a global name in spirituality and wellness. What is less known is that he has successfully played peacemaker in places racked by violence and bloodshed around the world. A peek into how he juggles these diverse roles.

Whisky's most powerful man

Inside Jim Murray’s war against the heathens in the business.

The race for India's first super car

Can mean metal motors repair India's reputation as the graveyard of automobile innovation?

‘People like us’ drive BlaBlaCar’s India model

Hundred days into its India ops, the french ride-sharing company has a following of like-minded people.

How education is uniting India Inc.

Big Business is moving on from focussing on institution building to ensuring grassroots outcomes.

Gadkari's way is the highway

The success of any public sector undertaking depends on the implementation of the policies that support its functioning. Nitin Gadkari, with his focus clearly on fixing the infrastructure problem, is fast emerging as its best role model.

Invest in Rajasthan

Combining infrastructure and incentives, Rajasthan is fast emerging as one of most sought-after destinations for industry and investors.

Giving wings to Good Earth

The Delhi-based design brand is readying for reinvention, but it has to get a move on.

Jobs Made in India

A whole range of gourmet products, from artisanal chocolate to single-estate coffee to fine single malts, is pushing the unlikely agenda of Make in India. Changing consumer behaviour is fuelling demand for local products—and thereby employment.

The subtle art of selling

Iconic British shoe brand John Lobb has never been flamboyant. such discreetness is highly prized by owner Hermès. but what about the buyer?

It’s all about script

Can’t read English? There’s a phone for that. Thanks to three IIT classmates (Akash Dongre, Rakesh Deshmukh, Sudhir Bangarambandi), English is no longer a barrier to using smartphones.

The work processors

Growing at a steady pace, TeamLease has set its sights on becoming the world’s biggest staffing company. Will having the Prime Minister’s ear help?

Stay tuned

Hotel aggregator MiStay enables people to book hotel rooms for a few hours instead of a full day.

For innovation, the time starts now

Making a company future-ready has to be an ongoing process there's no room to press pause and then plan.

The grit behind the glitter

The actual composition of a Swarovski crystal is still secret, 120 years after Daniel Swarovski set up a factory to manufacture and cut crystals. What isn’t a secret though is that Swarovski is changing from a purveyor of bling to a hi-tech brand in its own right.

Lack of growth is unsustainable: Johan Norberg

Swedish free trade advocate Johan Norberg discusses threats to economic progress and globalisation in an increasingly nationalist world.

Maid in India

How entrepreneur Gauri Singh plans to use technology to disrupt housekeeping.

Daring to be Dom

Champagne is under pressure from prosecco, while global warming threatens to ruin grape harvests. But none of that ruffles Dom Pérignon, perhaps the most shadowy, snooty, and expensive brand in the business. It just continues to sparkle. So, what’s its secret?

Their heart is on the sleeve…

...and in the collars, cuffs, pleats, and plackets they make. That’s Charvet, the world’s oldest shirt store. Established in 1838, it still operates from just one address in Paris.

Who benefits the most from Jio?

Hint: It’s not the subscriber (free voice calls notwithstanding).